As the science behind nutrition and athletic performance continues to be investigated, the impact of what athletes eat on their performance in their sport is becoming more important. Some nutrients need to be consumed in higher amounts in order to compensate for the increased workload of athletes and/or physically active people. For example, an athlete needs increased amounts of water to maintain adequate hydration status, which has a distinct influence on performance. It is also safe to say athletes expend a much greater energy load than the average person, so they require an increased amount of energy. Macronutrients — carbohydrates, fats and proteins — are energy sources that our bodies run on and help provide fuel during workouts. However, it is not just the amount of energy an athlete is consuming that matters, but the type of macronutrients that the energy is coming from that greatly influences how a person’s body will perform. Continue Reading

The infant formula market is growing rapidly as consumers decide to use powdered formulas as a supplement to, or in place of, breastfeeding. Formula typically serves as an infant’s sole source of nutrition, which poses unique challenges to infant food manufacturers. Because it serves as one of the only foods an infant consumes, it is vital to safeguard and protect infant formula against potential adulteration issues, whether that be physical, chemical or microbiological. Infant formula also contains more nutritional components than traditional foods, so the supply chain tends to be longer and more global than other commodities due to the procurement of many ingredients. Continue Reading

With the new Nutrition Labeling Regulation deadline quickly approaching, the addition of one small line is creating a lot of buzz – added sugars. When the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the changes to the Nutrition Facts Label in 2016, they included a requirement for the label to display added sugars, both in grams per serving and the percent Daily Value (%DV). Manufacturers have since been working to update their product specifications with added sugar values, companies are working to calculate the amount of added sugar in their products and consequently, consumers are beginning to see these values appear on the labels of the foods they eat. Although this new information is meant to help inform, both food manufacturers and consumers alike are unclear as to what counts as an added sugar and how much of it should be consumed. Continue Reading

Are you experiencing shelf-life issues or increased numbers of Listeria findings in a Ready-to-Eat foods environment? If so, you may want to take a deep dive into your equipment.

Largely, as a consequence of Listeria control efforts, most of us have at least a basic knowledge of hygienic equipment design. In truth, though, we often find inadequacies in the design of the equipment in our facilities, which are magnified with age and/or inadequate maintenance. Couple this with the widespread use of high-pressure water hoses and their ability to drive product residue, microorganisms and water deep inside equipment, and you have all the components needed to create a microbial growth niche. Continue Reading

The choice between eating a salad or a frosted donut may seem obvious in terms of nutrition, but for many of us, this can be a difficult decision. Despite our knowledge of the health benefits of fruits and vegetables, the majority of Americans are still failing to follow the federal dietary guidelines. In fact, a recently published study revealed that only 1 in 10 of American adults consume the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables (CDC, 2017). Continue Reading

In today’s social media-driven world, you can’t leave the quality of your products to chance. One missed step and you could face an onslaught of unhappy customers who are eager to share their experience with the internet. So how can you guarantee that quality food products will reach your customers? Go to the customers for opinions first by using sensory testing to ensure quality across your supply chain.   Continue Reading

Whether you grew up taking a brightly colored Flintstones vitamin every day or depended on reminders from your parents to eat your vegetables, you learned the importance of getting your vitamins on a daily basis. With consumers increasingly demanding transparency in the nutritional content of the foods they choose, do you know which vitamins you need to list on your labels? If you are choosing to make a claim on your label regarding the vitamin content in your product, do you understand how that vitamin appeals to consumers? Continue Reading

Hygienic zoning is a key critical preventive control that often does not get the attention that it deserves. The basic concept of hygienic zoning is to divide a food or feed manufacturing facility into defined areas based on food safety risks. This is commonly used to control microbiological risks but also for other segregation needs, such as allergen control, physical hazards or GMO versus non-GMO. Continue Reading