I am always amused when shopping in retail stores and I come across a garment or accessory that has a sizing tag that reads, “One Size Fits All.” This is beyond laughable. What are the chances that this is actually the case? Simple genetics tells us that no two people are exactly alike so how can one garment fit everyone? If you topped the growth charts, these “one-size” garments never fit all of you, and if you are an extra petite person, you can hang that same garment on yourself like draperies on a window. The results will not be favorable or hardly functional, and this garment will remain unworn and eventually be tossed into a donation box or sold in a garage sale. It is wasted money.

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During my 30-year career in the sensory and consumer research industry, I’ve found that some of the most misused and misunderstood tests by food manufacturers are difference tests, which determine if the attributes of two food products are different. One common difference test is a triangle test, which presents panelists in a study with three different samples to taste. Two of the samples are from the same product and one is from a different product. The test determines if the panelists are able to pick out the sample of the different product from the three presented. Continue Reading

A staggering number of new products are developed every year that never make it past first production and if they do, it’s only to die shortly thereafter. Highly successful food and beverage manufacturers are among the unlucky in this area and often have products that roll out only to lose momentum before the product ever really gets rolling. So this would suggest that it is not about capability to produce popular products…but seemingly rather the ability to figure out a concept that will be well received and a version that actually tastes good. Continue Reading