Clients often ask me, “If I am certified to the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), will I be ready for the FDA to inspect my operation for compliance with the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Preventive Controls Rule?” In the past, I have told many clients with certifications such as the Safe Quality Food (SQF) Code and British Retail Consortium (BRC) Standard, that because they went through the steps to become certified, they are well positioned to ensure compliance with the FSMA law requirements. However, there are similarities and differences between the two that must be taken into account. For companies that fall under the FDA regulatory jurisdiction and must become compliant with the FSMA Preventive Controls for Human Food Rule or the Animal Food Rule, taking the journey to become GFSI certified will help them meet the FSMA requirements. It will also change the working culture throughout the organization to prepare for FSMA implementation. Continue Reading

Over the years, I have heard horror stories about companies that were not improving daily operations, but instead experiencing massive chaos in the day-to-day management of their businesses. Those situations can lead to disaster for companies and, in some cases, even death for consumers. Having an effective food safety and quality management system in place will help reduce the chaos and create a system for continuous improvement. Creating goals is crucial to an effective food safety and quality management system. Does your company utilize food safety or quality objectives? Have you ever heard of SMART objectives? Let us take a journey into creating SMART-er objectives:  Continue Reading

Food manufacturers who find an issue during an internal food safety audit need to perform a root cause analysis and take corrective actions in order to eliminate the problem. But what if subsequent internal audits reveal the same repeating issue? That is a good indication that the company did not find all of the root causes to place corrective actions against. And for many companies, the issue comes back repeatedly despite corrective actions.  Continue Reading

Years ago, I was in a production facility, and a worker threw some trash into a barrel of product destined for a local pig farmer. The worker thought his actions were acceptable because of the common belief that pigs eat anything.

Over the years, many production facilities have taken products and by-products failing to meet finished product specifications and have sold them to “pig farmers” or other animal food companies. As I witnessed, sometimes employees would throw foreign material into the “pig food” or “animal food” container. Often, this product would be offered for “free” to farmers, as long as they picked it up frequently. Commonly, these containers on the back dock or in a walk-in refrigerator would not be labeled. Workers would throw trash in them because they were not trained about the risk of mixing trash with potential animal feed. Continue Reading