Highlights:

  • The new FDA Nutrition Facts Panel deadline is January 1st, 2020 for food manufacturers with $10 million or more in annual sales
  • Manufacturers with less than $10 million in annual sales have an additional year to comply
  • The FDA has updated its list of required nutrients, reference amounts for serving sizes, and the daily values
  • Added Sugars and Dietary Fiber values will require additional consideration, and cannot always be determined analytically
  • Don’t delay! Label printing will likely come before the FDA deadline

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Highlights:

  • Food labeling claims and food safety issues are responsible for the majority of lawsuits against food companies
  • ‘Natural’ labeling claims, foodborne illnesses, and chemical hazards have triggered several lawsuits this year
  • FDA is required to publish a highly anticipated and potentially controversial proposed rule to define high-risk foods
  • There is an upward trend in the annual number of 60-day notices associated with food products for Proposition 65
  • Lawsuits were filed this year to push the FDA to finalize specific FSMA regulations

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Earlier this year, Q1 held their 6th Annual Food Labeling Conference in Arlington, Virginia, where over one hundred representatives of the food industry gathered to discuss evolving regulatory issues within the food world. In today’s fast track to launch environment and short product lifecycles, organizations are challenged by the slow movement of supporting regulations and are forced to make calculated risks to satisfy their ever-demanding consumers. There were many excellent discussions and presenters at this conference, but they all had a basic theme that can be summarized in five key takeaways: Continue Reading

The evolving regulatory and consumer demands for “healthy” products with “clean labels” are challenging food and beverage manufacturers in North America. How can sugar, sodium and fat levels be reduced in products in order to meet public health goals, yet the products still retain a “crave-able” flavor and texture to satisfy consumer expectations?

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When you take a look at a packaged food in the United States and compare it to one from Canada, it’s more than just the dual languages that are displayed that make the Canadian market unique from their southern friends.  Let’s discuss a few of these not so obvious differences that you need to consider when producing or marketing your product in Canada.

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In the United States, two different regulatory organizations oversee food labeling for different product types. The first post in our blog series broke down which food products fall under the labeling jurisdiction for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as well as how the above affects a product’s statement of identity. Now that we’ve established that base, we will delve deeper into the various differences between USDA and FDA food labeling, from the way nutrition claims are handled to safe handling instructions and everything in between. Below are six essential differences between food labeling guidelines for the two regulatory bodies:

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The claims and information on a product’s label allow customers to make informed purchasing decisions. However, consumers may not realize when choosing between a frozen veggie or sausage pizza that the information on the labels for these two similar products is actually regulated by two different government agencies.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversee labeling for food items sold in the United States. The labels on products regulated by these two entities do share many common features, such as a statement of identity, net quantity declaration, nutrition label, ingredient statement and responsible party information. However, there are some differences in the information found on their respective labels. As part one of our two-part series on the differences between USDA and FDA labeling requirements, let’s examine the overlapping product categories and how the statement of identity can vary based on which entity oversees your product type. Continue Reading

The old saying is to never judge a book by its cover, but consumers regularly judge a food item by its label. Increasingly, customers are spending more time reading every part of a product’s label before they buy it, from the claims on the front to the nutrition information to the ingredients list. Here at Mérieux NutriSciences, our Labeling Compliance & Nutrition Services team works to help food manufacturers create compliant food, menu and nutrition labels with federal regulations, including Food and Drug Administration (FDA), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Health Canada. Continue Reading