In a previous blog post, I explained that the new produce safety regulations released as part of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) do not address the cause of past foodborne illness outbreaks, leaving the produce industry in limbo. It also leaves consumers unprotected because they view most produce items as being “ready-to-eat” (RTE), meaning that they are able to be consumed without any additional washing or cooking. Regardless of where a farm or packing shed falls within the regulations, this perception by consumers raises significant concerns for public health, which then fall to the grower or packer to address. Continue Reading

The choice between eating a salad or a frosted donut may seem obvious in terms of nutrition, but for many of us, this can be a difficult decision. Despite our knowledge of the health benefits of fruits and vegetables, the majority of Americans are still failing to follow the federal dietary guidelines. In fact, a recently published study revealed that only 1 in 10 of American adults consume the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables (CDC, 2017). Continue Reading

Throughout every facet of the frozen food and beverage industry, companies are navigating the new food safety landscape created by the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

Under FSMA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has finalized seven regulations covering produce safety, safe production and transport of food, imported food and food defense.

To aid companies in determining their FSMA-readiness, AFFI has developed unique FSMA Food Safety Self-Assessment Tools that are specifically tailored to members of the food and beverage industry. Continue Reading

Currently, the first stages of FSMA are being implemented, and the FDA is beginning to inspect facilities according to the new rules. In anticipation, companies in all sectors of the food industry are adjusting their food safety plans to meet the new requirements and pass inspections. Certain segments of the food industry, such as farms growing and harvesting fresh fruits and vegetables, are adjusting to new federal regulatory oversight that they have not experienced before. In particular, the processed fruit and vegetable segments are struggling with consumers treating their products as ready-to-eat, instead of their traditional use as raw agricultural commodities. This, coupled with the fact that the new regulations do not address the cause of past outbreaks, leaves the produce industry in limbo and the consumer unprotected. Continue Reading

In May, the National Conference on Interstate Milk Shipments (NCIMS) voted Preventive Controls for Human Food (PCHF) as part of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) into the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance (PMO). The PMO sets forth standards and requirements to regulate dairy plants producing Grade “A” products. This includes milk, fluid cream products, sour cream, yogurt, manufactured products, such as cottage cheese and dry ingredients. Continue Reading

All domestic and foreign food facilities that manufacture, process, pack or store food for sale in the United States must register with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). According to recent government data, approximately 114,000 foreign food facilities exporting to the U.S. are located in more than 200 countries, and 19% of the American food supply is now imported.

The growing number of foreign food facilities and expanding volume of imported food is fueling an increasingly complex U.S. food supply chain. Imported food has been linked to several high-profile food safety events in recent years and remains a significant concern. In fact, one of the core objectives of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was to ensure the safety of imported food. Continue Reading

The seventh and final major rule mandated by the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was recently published paving the way for the full implementation of the law. The final rule for mitigation strategies to prevent the intentional adulteration of food, also known as ‘food defense’, imposes new requirements for foreign and domestic food facilities. Following are eight points to know about the ‘food defense’ final rule and a few notes regarding the related issue of economically motivated adulteration. Continue Reading

For more than four years, food industry stakeholders have been eagerly awaiting publication of the final versions of the “seven foundational rules” mandated by FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). This month, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued the two final rules requiring facilities to identify potential hazards and implement controls for human food and animal food.

In the simplest terms, the final rule for human food requires firms to identify significant food safety risks, implement controls to mitigate the risks, monitor and verify the effectiveness of the processes, manage supply chain risks, and document activities. Continue Reading