Although it initially felt like the date may never come, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)  compliance date for the menu labeling regulation went into effect on May 7, 2018. Hooray! Restaurants and food service establishments are now required to add calorie counts to their menus and menu boards. Nutrition information can be found both on the restaurant’s website and within the establishment to provide customers with more transparency on the nutrition information for the menu items they love to eat.

While the regulation only requires restaurants with 20 or more locations to provide nutrition information, that doesn’t mean you can rest on your laurels if you only have 17 locations.  Remember that if you’re close to having 20 locations, it is best to start calculating your nutrition information months before your 20th location opens. The menu labeling process can take anywhere from six to eight weeks, on average. If your menu contains more dishes than average, it may take even longer. As you are planning for the future of your business, this is important to consider because you will need to be in compliance with menu labeling regulations once your 20th location opens.

Now that the compliance date for menu labeling has come and gone, the restaurant industry still has questions left unanswered. Am I required to post allergen information? How is the FDA going to enforce menu labeling? Do I need to update my nutrition information? Mérieux NutriSciences reached out to restaurants and food service establishments to gather your burning questions. We selected some of the more popular questions to discuss in our latest vlog, which you can watch below!

 

 

Do you still have questions about menu labeling? Join the discussion by leaving a comment below with your question, and a member of our labeling compliance team will respond to you. If you need help complying with menu labeling regulations, Merieux NutriSciences’ Labeling Compliance & Nutrition Services department can help. Our team is dedicated to working with restaurants and food service establishments to comply with menu labeling regulations and meet other needs, such as developing menu items for special diets. Contact us today to get started!

Meet the Author

Sophie Lauer, RD
Associate Nutrition Program Manager, Mérieux NutriSciences

Sophie Lauer is the Associate Nutrition Program Manager at Mérieux NutriSciences. She received her Bachelor of Sciences in Applied Health Science, Dietetics from Indiana University. Sophie received her MBA from Dominican University. In her free time, she enjoys cooking for friends and family as well as playing with her goldendoodle.

It’s already been a month since the menu labeling compliance date of May 7, 2018 has passed! Can you believe it? Many restaurants and food service establishment teams are breathing a sigh of relief now that their menus are compliant, but do you know what you need to focus on next regarding menu labeling? To help shed some light on menu maintenance and future trends, read my responses to the 5 key questions you may have now that the compliance date has finally come and gone.

1) How is the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) enforcing these regulations? The FDA has said that they will be working with restaurants to make sure they are complying with menu labeling regulations accurately. However, it is unknown if the FDA will have an enforcement plan and charge fines for non-compliance in the future. Continue Reading

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently announced an extension of the menu labeling compliance date to May 7, 2018. Restaurant and food service establishments with 20 or more locations now have additional time to make nutrition information available to customers. This includes updating menu boards and menus to include calorie information, as well as having complete nutrition information available to customers in their establishments. Continue Reading

Restaurants with 20 or more locations need to comply with menu labeling regulations by May 5, 2017, but they also need to ensure their menu labels maintain accuracy over time. Menus need to be updated with new labels as recipes change, items are added or as time passes to verify the information is still correct. But if you’re new to this whole restaurant menu labeling process, how can you implement an effective plan that includes the necessary menu maintenance? Continue Reading

Take a deep breath. It’s May 5, 2017 and your menu labels are compliant with FDA menu labeling laws. You’re done!

But wait, suddenly you get that feeling – you know, that feeling that you’ve forgotten something…

Menu Maintenance!

Restaurant menu labeling is an ongoing process. After you initially post your nutrition information online and calories on the menu board, your work is not finished. But, we have good news! Menu maintenance doesn’t need to be a painful process for restaurants or food service establishments. To make menu maintenance easier, create a system that includes continuous monitoring and updating of your menu. Continue Reading

Feeling overwhelmed by new federal menu labeling laws? You’re not alone. Finding a 3rd party partner to work with for compliance can be stressful, but choosing the right partner will allow you to spend your time running your business while still meeting regulation deadlines.

When looking for a team of experts to utilize for your required FDA menu labeling updates, consider these five key attributes: Continue Reading

With Halloween around the corner, don’t let the rapidly approaching deadline for menu labeling regulations scare you. You may not want to think about next May, but you must! Especially if you are in the restaurant or food service industries.

Beginning May 5th, 2017, all restaurants and food service providers with 20 or more establishments under the same name or that serve the same type of food are required to list calories on menus and menu boards. You may not think this is a big deal, but in addition to printed menus, consider the number of restaurants that offer online menus on their website, apps, and 3rd party websites such as GrubHub or Yelp. This project is a bit of a doozy! Continue Reading