Highlights:

  • The new FDA Nutrition Facts Panel deadline is January 1st, 2020 for food manufacturers with $10 million or more in annual sales
  • Manufacturers with less than $10 million in annual sales have an additional year to comply
  • The FDA has updated its list of required nutrients, reference amounts for serving sizes, and the daily values
  • Added Sugars and Dietary Fiber values will require additional consideration, and cannot always be determined analytically
  • Don’t delay! Label printing will likely come before the FDA deadline

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Did you ever wonder why your favorite ice cream has the nutrition information for a ⅔ cup? It’s because the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed serving sizes for multiple categories referred to as Reference Amounts Customarily Consumed (RACC).

The ice cream you purchase from any retailer will be using the same serving size (household measure may differ), so you’re able to easily compare the nutrition information. The FDA took a look at the RACC’s and updated them with the 2016 Nutrition Facts Label to better fit what people are actually consuming in one sitting.

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Most everyone remembers the food pyramid from their grade school days (or even later in life), which was the visual cue issued by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for Americans to use when making decisions regarding their dietary habits and choices. Unfortunately, the food pyramid marketing programs were so successful that most Americans still have not transitioned to the new USDA health program, MyPlate, which replaced the food pyramid program back in 2011. The food industry is partially to blame since many of the food labels making dietary guideline product claims continue to cite old vocabulary from the food pyramid days, for example “servings” of fruits and vegetables instead of “cups” from the new and improved MyPlate plan. Understanding how to apply the MyPlate criteria to produce properly is one clear way to communicate healthy eating choices to our growing population.

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Co-authored by Irene Chau

For anyone who grew up in the 80’s and 90’s, the first dietary supplement you took was probably the Flintstones multivitamin. How many of you remember taking them and enjoying that fruity flavor? Our parents wanted to make sure we wouldn’t become deficient in the essential minerals and vitamins our bodies needed because we refused to eat the actual vegetables that were served with our meals. Boy, have things changed! Continue Reading

Improving nutrition for the burgeoning global population is one of today’s major public health challenges. According to the World Health Organization, millions of children suffer from undernutrition in low and middle-income countries each year, and global estimates suggest that more than 40 million children living in urban and high-income countries under five years of age are either overweight or obese. Both of these issues are considered malnutrition, as they stem from an imbalance in micro and macronutrient intake, as well as lead to high risks of subsequent disease and mortality. Continue Reading

Co-authored by Upasana Hariram, MS

You may have heard the phrase “nutrient stability” before, but do you know what it means and how it applies to your products? Nutrient stability refers to the length of time a nutrient remains in a food product at a desired level. If you are declaring nutrients on your product’s label, then you need to understand the stability of your product’s nutrients. This applies to a plethora of product categories including, but not limited to, pet food, beverages, adult food products, infant formula, toddler food and supplements. Continue Reading

Food plays a large role in our daily lives, but choosing the right foods to fit our individual lifestyles is not always easy. For example, someone may need to eat more calories if they’re training for a triathlon or incorporate more vegetables and whole grains into their meals if they’re trying to increase their fiber intake. Other times, consumers may simply be trying to choose a nutritionally-sound option for a meal on-the-go.

The theme for this year’s National Nutrition Month is “Go Further with Food,” which places an emphasis on selecting the right foods to meet individual needs. For restaurants and food manufacturers, this month serves as a reminder to track your progress in complying with upcoming labeling regulations and examine opportunities to develop new products to meet consumer needs. The Food Drug Administration (FDA) is making it easier for consumers to find transparent nutrition information on the foods they eat with menu labeling and nutrition labeling regulations coming into compliance soon. Continue Reading

As most of you have heard, the Food Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed an extension to the compliance dates for the Nutrition Facts Label regulations announced in 2016. The proposed new deadlines will be January 1, 2020 for food manufacturers with $10 million or greater in annual food sales and January 1, 2021 for food manufacturers with less than $10 million in annual food sales. Although the deadline has been pushed, many food manufacturers and retailers have already switched to the new nutrition label. If you are having trouble getting started, here is Mérieux NutriSciences easy guide with the 6 steps you should take to implement the new nutrition label. Continue Reading