High in Vitamin A. Excellent source of Calcium. Low in Sodium. It’s nearly impossible to find a food label that doesn’t display a nutrient content claim. So what exactly is a nutrient content claim?

Nutrient content claims characterize the value of a vitamin or mineral in a food, as defined by the Food Drug Administration (FDA). To better understand these claims and their use, read our five facts below! Continue Reading

It’s hard to watch TV without seeing an ad for a product claiming to help people lose weight. But when you see one of those ads, you may wonder – how solid is the science behind these claims? To gain some understanding, I asked our nutrition scientists at Biofortis, Mérieux NutriSciences’ clinical research facility, if weight loss and weight maintenance claims, like the ones seen on TV, can be proven by clinical research. The short answer is yes; there are tried and true protocols used by leading commercial weight loss companies to demonstrate the effectiveness of their products in situations that mirror real-world scenarios. Continue Reading

Whether you’re buying a bag of chips from a vending machine or reaching for an apple from the fruit bowl, everyone enjoys snacking. In fact, I’m thinking about having a snack right now! But what if your snack could actually work to your body’s favor, in addition to being a treat you look forward to? Our Biofortis scientists explored this concept in recent studies and presented their findings with posters at the Experimental Biology conference last month in Chicago. Continue Reading

Did you know federal health authorities have estimated 44% of the sodium consumed by Americans comes from only 10 types of food? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the diet of 90% of Americans exceeds the recommended dietary sodium level for optimal public health. The high sodium levels found in many processed foods have triggered calls for food companies to reduce the salt content of food products; however, eliminating this valuable additive from food products can be a complex process. Continue Reading

The United States and Canada have both made significant changes to their nutrition labels in the past year. In response, food manufacturers are dusting off each product’s Certificate of Analysis (COA) to create new nutrition labels in order to comply with updated regulations. But food manufacturers should consider how old their nutrient data is before using it to create a new label. Before sending those new labels to print, check to make sure your nutrient values are still usable.  Continue Reading

What is a “healthy” food? Should a “healthy” food contain specific levels of vitamins and minerals? Conversely, should a “healthy” food limit potentially harmful components such as saturated fat, cholesterol, sugar or sodium? Questions surrounding the definition of a “healthy” labeling claim have surged in recent years due to the rising consumer demand for nutritious foods. Continue Reading

How sweet is it? Beginning July 26, 2018, the true nature of your products’ sugar content will be on display with the new mandatory Added Sugars line on the Nutrition Facts Label. But how do you know what is considered an added sugar? To answer that question, we need to delve into the new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) nutrition labeling requirements.

On July 26, 2016, the FDA released new nutrition labeling regulations, which includes an overhaul of the required Nutrition Facts Label. The new regulations go into effect in July 2018 for large food manufacturers, and July 2019 for food manufacturers with less that $10 million in annual food sales. One of the most notable differences on the new label is the Added Sugars line. This new addition will be located directly beneath the Total Sugars line, which will replace the Sugars line on the old label. Continue Reading

FDA Revising Criteria for “Healthy” Food

Reflecting the latest scientific information, including the link between diet and chronic diseases, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a final guidance in late September to stipulate the approved use of the labeling claim “healthy” on packaged foods and to request industry comments regarding the use of the term. Industry comments should inform FDA’s efforts to redefine the term “healthy” in order to align with the new final rules for updating the Nutrition Facts Panel and serving size information for packaged foods. Continue Reading