The infant formula market is growing rapidly as consumers decide to use powdered formulas as a supplement to, or in place of, breastfeeding. Formula typically serves as an infant’s sole source of nutrition, which poses unique challenges to infant food manufacturers. Because it serves as one of the only foods an infant consumes, it is vital to safeguard and protect infant formula against potential adulteration issues, whether that be physical, chemical or microbiological. Infant formula also contains more nutritional components than traditional foods, so the supply chain tends to be longer and more global than other commodities due to the procurement of many ingredients. Continue Reading

The choice between eating a salad or a frosted donut may seem obvious in terms of nutrition, but for many of us, this can be a difficult decision. Despite our knowledge of the health benefits of fruits and vegetables, the majority of Americans are still failing to follow the federal dietary guidelines. In fact, a recently published study revealed that only 1 in 10 of American adults consume the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables (CDC, 2017). Continue Reading

Hygienic zoning is a key critical preventive control that often does not get the attention that it deserves. The basic concept of hygienic zoning is to divide a food or feed manufacturing facility into defined areas based on food safety risks. This is commonly used to control microbiological risks but also for other segregation needs, such as allergen control, physical hazards or GMO versus non-GMO. Continue Reading

During my time working in the food industry, I’ve noticed that HACCP system verification and validation activities are rarely given the attention they deserve. Facilities typically meet the minimum regulatory requirements and do little beyond that. How does your company stack up? Have you implemented a variety of periodic verification activities to supplement routine verification measures in your facility? If not, it may be time to give HACCP verification and validation another look. Continue Reading

The nutrients found in foods provide our bodies with energy for growth and repair, as they are composed of carbohydrates, protein, fats, minerals and vitamins. Carbohydrates make up a group of organic compounds that include sugars and starches, while proteins are important for growth and repair, and fats or lipids can supply more than twice the amount of energy as carbohydrates or proteins. The amount of a given nutrient found in a food item can be determined using analytical chemistry tests. Continue Reading

Dangerous attacks in the food industry occur frequently and are not always as high profile as you might think. Are you aware that, in recent years, many companies in the food industry have been affected by intentional attacks on the products they manufacture? The time has come for food manufacturers to ask themselves: what can be done to prevent tragedy from striking in your facility? Continue Reading

Coffee lovers in California could soon be jolted awake by a cancer warning displayed in all coffee chains, grocers and other retail store locations. While scientific studies have shown a “cup of joe” can reduce the risk of many diseases, including certain cancers and type 2 diabetes, scientists have also determined that roasted coffee poses a cancer risk. Continue Reading

Currently, the first stages of FSMA are being implemented, and the FDA is beginning to inspect facilities according to the new rules. In anticipation, companies in all sectors of the food industry are adjusting their food safety plans to meet the new requirements and pass inspections. Certain segments of the food industry, such as farms growing and harvesting fresh fruits and vegetables, are adjusting to new federal regulatory oversight that they have not experienced before. In particular, the processed fruit and vegetable segments are struggling with consumers treating their products as ready-to-eat, instead of their traditional use as raw agricultural commodities. This, coupled with the fact that the new regulations do not address the cause of past outbreaks, leaves the produce industry in limbo and the consumer unprotected. Continue Reading