Dangerous attacks in the food industry occur frequently and are not always as high profile as you might think. Are you aware that, in recent years, many companies in the food industry have been affected by intentional attacks on the products they manufacture? The time has come for food manufacturers to ask themselves: what can be done to prevent tragedy from striking in your facility? Continue Reading

Throughout every facet of the frozen food and beverage industry, companies are navigating the new food safety landscape created by the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

Under FSMA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has finalized seven regulations covering produce safety, safe production and transport of food, imported food and food defense.

To aid companies in determining their FSMA-readiness, AFFI has developed unique FSMA Food Safety Self-Assessment Tools that are specifically tailored to members of the food and beverage industry. Continue Reading

Currently, the first stages of FSMA are being implemented, and the FDA is beginning to inspect facilities according to the new rules. In anticipation, companies in all sectors of the food industry are adjusting their food safety plans to meet the new requirements and pass inspections. Certain segments of the food industry, such as farms growing and harvesting fresh fruits and vegetables, are adjusting to new federal regulatory oversight that they have not experienced before. In particular, the processed fruit and vegetable segments are struggling with consumers treating their products as ready-to-eat, instead of their traditional use as raw agricultural commodities. This, coupled with the fact that the new regulations do not address the cause of past outbreaks, leaves the produce industry in limbo and the consumer unprotected. Continue Reading

The Trump Administration’s Executive Orders requiring federal agencies to eliminate two regulations for every new regulation is adversely impacting the agencies responsible for food safety and nutrition. On July 20th, the federal government released the latest Unified Agenda of federal regulatory activities, which contained a new category for regulations requiring further review or consideration.

Within the Spring 2017 agenda, more than 100 regulatory measures were identified under this new category “inactive,” including significant regulations related to food labeling, organic agriculture and the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). The impactful regulatory measures considered “inactive” in the food industry are detailed below: Continue Reading

With summer vacation season upon us, most people can relate to the angst of the question, “Are we there yet?”  In fact, I suspect many food industry professionals have recently pondered this question when reflecting on the regulations of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), and then wondered what is “coming down the pike?”

Upon enactment of the FSMA law in January 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) implemented a few requirements immediately, but the most significant rules require years to develop.  The implementation phase of the FSMA regulations officially began two years ago with the beginning of Phase II of the FDA’s operational strategy for FSMA, which included regulator training and targeted risk-based inspection, sampling, testing and data collection activities. Continue Reading

As the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) moves forward with Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) implementation, food companies are beginning to realize the need for effective environmental monitoring procedures to minimize microbial cross-contamination and allergen cross-contact. In developing the Preventive Controls Rule for Human Food, the FDA revised the antiquated Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) once contained in 21 CFR Part 110 and now published in 21 CFR Part 117. In doing so, the FDA has been very specific in addressing environmental contamination in the revised GMPs and in the new Preventive Control regulations.  Continue Reading

After a flood of food regulations during President Obama’s administration, the food regulatory environment in the United States could experience a drought in new regulations due to the deregulatory philosophy of the Trump administration and the U.S. Congress.

In April, President Trump signed an executive order with the objective of eliminating unnecessary “regulatory burdens” for the agricultural sector. Earlier this year, the U.S. House passed legislation (H.R. 5), referred to as the “filthy food act” by opponents, which would impede the development of new food regulations. The U.S. Senate is expected to vote on the bill later this month. Continue Reading

For over 20 years, the food industry has been steadfast in our view of the role of sanitation in classical Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programs. Our experience with meat and poultry HACCP by way of the International HACCP Alliance and what came later with Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) HACCP requirements solidified the supportive role of sanitation as a food safety prerequisite program. We have managed sanitation as a separate prerequisite program, and then used these programs to eliminate the need for sanitation critical control points. However, compliance with the Preventive Controls Rule for Human Food (PCHF) as part of the Food Safety Modernization Act requires a different approach in how we manage sanitation procedures that directly addresses a food safety hazard identified in the hazard analysis. Continue Reading