Improving nutrition for the burgeoning global population is one of today’s major public health challenges. According to the World Health Organization, millions of children suffer from undernutrition in low and middle-income countries each year, and global estimates suggest that more than 40 million children living in urban and high-income countries under five years of age are either overweight or obese. Both of these issues are considered malnutrition, as they stem from an imbalance in micro and macronutrient intake, as well as lead to high risks of subsequent disease and mortality. Continue Reading

As the science behind nutrition and athletic performance continues to be investigated, the impact of what athletes eat on their performance in their sport is becoming more important. Some nutrients need to be consumed in higher amounts in order to compensate for the increased workload of athletes and/or physically active people. For example, an athlete needs increased amounts of water to maintain adequate hydration status, which has a distinct influence on performance. It is also safe to say athletes expend a much greater energy load than the average person, so they require an increased amount of energy. Macronutrients — carbohydrates, fats and proteins — are energy sources that our bodies run on and help provide fuel during workouts. However, it is not just the amount of energy an athlete is consuming that matters, but the type of macronutrients that the energy is coming from that greatly influences how a person’s body will perform. Continue Reading