In the nutrition world, we often say that “bad foods” don’t exist. As a licensed and registered dietitian, I have observed clients who have tried and failed to use different approaches to losing weight that contradicts this philosophy. These methods include eliminating entire food groups, restrictive diets, supplements, teas and more. When giving diet advice, I often remind people that achieving a diet and lifestyle change for a short period of time is one challenge, but maintaining it is another. Continue Reading

With the new Nutrition Labeling Regulation deadline quickly approaching, the addition of one small line is creating a lot of buzz – added sugars. When the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the changes to the Nutrition Facts Label in 2016, they included a requirement for the label to display added sugars, both in grams per serving and the percent Daily Value (%DV). Manufacturers have since been working to update their product specifications with added sugar values, companies are working to calculate the amount of added sugar in their products and consequently, consumers are beginning to see these values appear on the labels of the foods they eat. Although this new information is meant to help inform, both food manufacturers and consumers alike are unclear as to what counts as an added sugar and how much of it should be consumed. Continue Reading

Whether you grew up taking a brightly colored Flintstones vitamin every day or depended on reminders from your parents to eat your vegetables, you learned the importance of getting your vitamins on a daily basis. With consumers increasingly demanding transparency in the nutritional content of the foods they choose, do you know which vitamins you need to list on your labels? If you are choosing to make a claim on your label regarding the vitamin content in your product, do you understand how that vitamin appeals to consumers? Continue Reading

Maybe you’ve heard the buzz, or maybe you’ve even seen it on one of your favorite food products – the FDA Nutrition Facts Label got a major makeover. When we consider the brief history in nutrition labeling in the United States, this revision to existing regulations was long overdue. Let’s take a look at the history of the Nutrition Facts Label to get a better understanding of why these changes were much needed. Continue Reading

All natural. Gluten free. Low in fat. Organic. Peanut free. The number of claims available for use to describe a food seems endless, so how does a manufacturer or producer know which words they can and cannot use? Taking one quick trip down the grocery aisle bombards a consumer with confusing label call-outs, outrageous marketing promises and countless newly innovative products.

The food and beverage market is a multi-million dollar industry that just keeps growing, providing consumers with access to trendy or niche foods they have never heard of before. The fast-paced world of food research and new product introductions may even leave some consumers questioning how true some of these claims are on new products with their fancy marketing call-outs and implied promises of renewed health and energy. Continue Reading

The United States and Canada have both made significant changes to their nutrition labels in the past year. In response, food manufacturers are dusting off each product’s Certificate of Analysis (COA) to create new nutrition labels in order to comply with updated regulations. But food manufacturers should consider how old their nutrient data is before using it to create a new label. Before sending those new labels to print, check to make sure your nutrient values are still usable.  Continue Reading

On the regulatory front, 2016 presented many challenges for the North American food industry. While the year featured the initial implementation of FSMA regulations and passage of the GMO labeling law, the North American food industry was also confronted by a slew of regulatory changes related to food labeling.

Last year, the food industry monitored the development of several potentially significant regulatory initiatives with upcoming compliance dates, including the revision of the FDA Nutrition Facts Panel (July 26, 2018), menu labeling for restaurants (May 5, 2017) and the withdrawal of the GRAS status of PHOs (June 18, 2018). Continue Reading

How sweet is it? Beginning July 26, 2018, the true nature of your products’ sugar content will be on display with the new mandatory Added Sugars line on the Nutrition Facts Label. But how do you know what is considered an added sugar? To answer that question, we need to delve into the new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) nutrition labeling requirements.

On July 26, 2016, the FDA released new nutrition labeling regulations, which includes an overhaul of the required Nutrition Facts Label. The new regulations go into effect in July 2018 for large food manufacturers, and July 2019 for food manufacturers with less that $10 million in annual food sales. One of the most notable differences on the new label is the Added Sugars line. This new addition will be located directly beneath the Total Sugars line, which will replace the Sugars line on the old label. Continue Reading